What did you say about your horrible boss?

I’m Just Sayin’

by SHEILA SMITH

If you think your boss is an idiot (especially if you have proof your boss is an idiot), I think you should be able to say so.

Honesty is the best policy, right?

The National Labor Relations Board had ruled employees were free to complain about management without retribution. Now that ruling is being challenged. As of now, you can still complain online (to a degree) without being canned but that could change very soon.

Of course, the “don’t talk about your boss” issue has been a hot topic in the past few years thanks to social media like Facebook and Twitter. Most people treat their social media sites like online personal diaries, and that includes entries about bad days (or years) at work.

Some people believe sharing your opinion of your boss is wrong and warrants termination. But we all go to work to make money, not friends; I’m just sayin’.

After all, let’s be honest: Just because you are the top dog in a department or company does not mean you are the brightest crayon in the box. It does not mean you are the nicest person. It does not even mean you are the hardest working person. No, sometimes the boss is the boss because the owners or those even higher up the chain are just as brainless when it comes to making major decisions.

Sometimes I even find myself doing business somewhere and asking an employee about their boss, “You have to answer to that person? I’m so sorry.”

Do you know what is even worse than having less than stellar individuals as your leaders? Training your boss.

I had a job once where a few lowly coworkers and myself had to train about three different people who were made a boss at separate times.

Only those who have ever had to train their boss understand how frustrating that is.

Of course, it makes for great comebacks.

“How do I do this?” the boss asks.

“You tell me, you’re the boss.”

I realize we all prefer working in and doing business in environments that are peaceful but we all know that most businesses have some level of stress between employees and bosses. If you have accepted any type of leadership position in the work place, in my opinion, you have also accepted that you will be held to a higher standard; that includes accepting that not everyone on the playground likes you and that you may not know as much as you think you do. Furthermore, just because an employee is honest about the fact that they would rather not hang out with you on the weekends is not enough reason to be terminated. If the employee can keep the problems out of the work place and does his or her job well, as a boss, you should suck it up and move on.

Short URL: http://www.jenningsdailynews.net/?p=17074

Posted by on Jan 30 2013. Filed under Editorial Columns. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0. Both comments and pings are currently closed.

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