BP: Jindal admin. ‘misrepresents’ company’s record?

BP and state officials aren’t seeing eye to eye at the moment.

BP is accusing the Jindal administration of misrepresenting its record in the 2010 Gulf of Mexico oil spill, including how much it has spent on cleanup, according to a report from The Associated Press.

Geoff Morrell, BP’s vice president of U.S. communications, responded Thursday to comments made a day earlier by Jindal and his top coastal official, Garret Graves, during and after a meeting of the Gulf Coast Ecosystem Restoration Council.

Morrell said the Jindal administration’s “political grandstanding contains patently false assertions, defies the demonstrated record of environmental recovery that has occurred across the Gulf, and defames the massive efforts of tens of thousands of people to foster prompt recovery and restoration.”

But in a response emailed to The Associated Press, Jindal’s top coastal official, Graves replied, “BP is not a victim of this disaster. No matter what they say or do, the families of the deceased and the citizens of the Gulf are the victims and we are going to fight to hold BP accountable for their actions. BP’s campaign to portray themselves as the victim is shameless.”

During the council meeting, Jindal said BP has focused too much on its image and needs to turn its attention to covering restoration costs.

According to Jindal, BP needs to “stop spending hundreds of millions of dollars on their public relations campaign telling us how great they are and start proving it by addressing their Clean Water Act and Natural Resources Damage liabilities now. While Transocean has stepped up to the plate and paid much of their liability, BP has not.”

Morrell said overall to date, BP has spent more than $26 billion on response, cleanup and claims, and accusations that BP has spent more money on advertising than this “are grossly in error and seem purposefully intended to mislead the public.”

Jindal praised Transocean Ltd. for pleading guilty to its role in the massive oil spill and agreeing to pay $1.4 billion in civil and criminal fines. BP, which has agreed to a record $4 billion in criminal fines, is in litigation over civil fines.

A blowout of BP’s Macondo well in April 2010 triggered an explosion on the Deepwater Horizon drilling rig, which BP was leasing from Transocean. The explosion killed 11 workers and spawned the nation’s worst offshore oil spill.

“For BP executives to try to call our concerns ‘grandstanding’ is laughable,” Graves said. “They caused the worst oil spill in our nation’s history, are doing the worst cleanup in our nation’s history and we should sit idle and let them continue?

The RESTORE Act, passed by Congress last year, dictates that 80 percent of the Clean Water Act penalties paid by BP be divided among Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama, Florida and Texas. Not only would a large chunk of that money be spread out evenly among the Gulf states, but the legislation also gives them some flexibility in deciding how the money is spent.

Jindal said in May that Louisiana will get $320 million from the $1 billion that BP has put into another pot for coastal restoration, but Graves said it likely will be years before Louisiana gets the money.

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Posted by on Aug 31 2013. Filed under Editorials. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0. Both comments and pings are currently closed.

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